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2021 Food Insecurity Symposium

Race, Inequity, and Food Security

Check out our Flash Talks!  

 

There are many ongoing efforts across all of our partner university campuses and communities to learn more about food insecurity, racial equity, and food systems. These short talks highlight some of the individuals and organizations studying these issues and working towards solutions for food insecurity and equity.

Jump to a Flash Talk

 

Duke and Durham Divide & Sustainable Solutions

Rebecca Hoeffler

Feed the Pack Food Pantry

Rose Krebs

Asset Mapping Community Based Food Organizations in North Carolina

National Clinician Scholars Program

Gillian Adynski, PhD, RN; Melissa Burnside, MD, MHS; Rachel Lipsky, MSN, PMHNP-BC, PhD;

Justine Seidenfeld, MD; Yuqi Zhang, MD

The Impact of COVID-19 on Local School and Community Food Insecurity Programs

Ainsley Buck*, Sophie Hurewitz*, Lilianna Suarez, Michelle S. Franklin, Emma Dries, Emma Garman, Elizabeth Jones, Reed Kenny, Ellie Winslow, Beth Gifford, K.K. Lam, Charlene A. Wong, Gillian D. Sanders Schmidler, and Rushina Cholera

*Both authors equally contributed.

Internship: Food Security Taskforce at the Montgomery County Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security

Ananya Tadikonda

Root Causes Fresh Produce Program

Julien Xie

TABLE

Michaela Ashworth

Duke World Food Policy Center

Sarah Zoubek

Duke Benefits Enrollment Center

Meghan Price

Tallgrass Food Box

Gerald Harris

The Campus Pantry Collaborative

Rashmi Joglekar, PhD; Nicole Stantial; Hannah McMillan; Alex Eaker; Katie Waeldner; Maia Matheny; Julianna Rennie

NC A&T Mobile Food Pantry: The Impact of Food Insecurity on the NC A&T State University Community

Courtney Anderson, Mikayla Massey, Cole Riley

Combating Food Insecurity at Duke: Feed Every Devil Program

Sude Almus, Ahmad Khan, Yuna Kim, Louise Lu, Kehan Zhang

GPSG Community Pantry/Founding

Nicole Stantial; Rashmi Joglekar, PhD; Kaitlyn Daly, BSN, RN

Addressing Food Insecurity in Higher Education - Operational Considerations

Shannon K. Orr, PhD

Best Practices for Recruiting and Managing Volunteers in Campus Food Pantries

Natalie Orslene

Duke Student Collaborative on Health Policy

Emma Herold and Brianna Cellini

Durham Technical Community College’s Campus Harvest Food Pantry

Jessica Dormandy

Building Duke's Food Insecurity Safety Net Sustainability and Quality Assurance, Duke Dining

Marcus Carson

Food Environment Assessment of Duke Graduate and Professional Students

Lexi Wang

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Flash Talk Recordings

Duke and Durham Divide & Sustainable Solutions

 

Rebecca Hoeffler

Abstract

Duke University is one of the world’s leading education and research institutions that strives to find solutions to society’s most pressing problems. At the same time, only miles away from this globally recognized entity, residents of Durham suffer from the very problems Duke students, staff, and faculty are dedicated to understanding and solving.  Food insecurity is a reality for lower resourced residents, especially senior citizens and disabled adults living in subsidized housing. Duke has the power to bridge the academic connection and apply research, hands-on-learning, and community building to those who need it most right in our own backyard. Learn about the Bull City Community Garden, a partnership between Duke and Durham to turn an unused green roof into a production garden to feed food insecure senior citizens. Dive into the reality of food access among seniors and disabled adults living in subsidized housing through the newly released 2020 Survey. Learn about sustainable solutions students can participate in that will enable a more just tomorrow for Duke and Durham. 

Duke and Durham Divide and Sustainable Solutins

Feed the Pack Food Pantry: Pantry Partnerships and Growth

 

Rose Krebs 

Abstract

Feed the Pack Food Pantry was founded in 2012 with the mission of meeting the food needs of the NC State community with dignity and respect. Since its inception, the student leadership team has been focused on improving the services the pantry provides. Establishing partnerships has been a crucial part of this process. Partnerships can come in many forms—from annual food drives to providing the pantry with a consistent supply of fresh produce and perishables. In this flash talk, we will discuss how we have created sustainable partnerships on and off campus. We will also consider the impact of these partnerships on our pantry and offer advice to those hoping to expand their own partnerships and build further connections within their communities. As Feed the Pack continues to grow and evolve, we will continue to look for ways to partner with our community, advocate for student food security initiatives, and support other food security resources in our community.  

Feed the Pack Food Pantry

Asset Mapping Community Based Food Organizations in North Carolina

National Clinician Scholars Program

 

Gillian Adynski, PhD, RN; Melissa Burnside, MD, MHS; Rachel Lipsky, MSN, PMHNP-BC, PhD; Justine Seidenfeld, MD; Yuqi Zhang, MD

Abstract

North Carolina is the10th hungriest state. Food insecurity is a complex problem that is rooted in social and economic conditions. An awareness and identification of programs and services that can assist the populations at risk of food insecurity is instrumental in addressing this problem. Asset Mapping is a critical tool that can be used to assess, identify, and build on community resources to address community needs and improve the health of populations at risk of food insecurity. 

 

The creation of the asset map will serve as a resource for food organization and individuals to use in 7 North Carolina counties of Wake, Durham, Franklin, Granville, Person, Vance, and Warren. It will provide a central organization of services that community organizations provide, as well as how these organizations work together and create networks with each other to produce and distribute food in North Carolina. Interviews with stakeholders and key informants from these counties in Winter 2020 has informed the survey that will be provided to several CBOs for distribution in early 2021. The results will be used to develop a comprehensive map of food-related resources available to the community.

Asset Mapping Food Orgs in NC

The Impact of COVID-19 on Local School and Community Food Insecurity Programs

 

Ainsley Buck*, Sophie Hurewitz*, Lilianna Suarez, Michelle S. Franklin, Emma Dries, Emma Garman, Elizabeth Jones, Reed Kenny, Ellie Winslow, Beth Gifford, K.K. Lam, Charlene A. Wong, Gillian D. Sanders Schmidler, and Rushina Cholera

*Both authors equally contributed.

Abstract

Childhood food insecurity is a well-recognized social determinant of health affecting 14% of households with children. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, this number has risen to nearly 30%. Given the impact of food insecurity on child health, clinical providers are increasingly screening for and addressing food needs. In order to inform cross-sector clinic-community intervention strategies, we conducted a qualitative study with key organization stakeholders in five NC counties. Stakeholders were asked to describe program operations, networks, and challenges in the pandemic context. Key stakeholders highlighted that program utilization more than doubled due to COVID-19. One program reported serving 1300 individuals/month as compared to 150 individuals/month prior to COVID-19. Notably, school closures have resulted in replacing Free/Reduced Lunch with weekday and weekend meals to students in need. Transportation was highlighted as a major barrier to families receiving food assistance before and during COVID-19. Stakeholders also reported a decrease in volunteers due to being part of an at-risk age group. This was countered by a heightened societal awareness of food insecurity and increased financial support and food donations. While community and school food programs have responded to rising need, access, both geographically and to nutrient-rich foods, continue to be challenges.  

Impact of COVID on School and Community Initiatives

The Campus Pantry Collaborative

 

Rashmi Joglekar, PhD; Nicole Stantial; Hannah McMillan; Alex Eaker; Katie Waeldner; Maia Matheny; Julianna Rennie

Abstract

The Campus Pantry Collaborative (CPC) is a student-led effort to address food insecurity across college campuses. The CPC serves as a collaborative space where food pantries at our partner institutions can share resources, best practices, and expand efforts to reach underserved student populations. The CPC  also serves as a platform through which groups can advocate for, and work to ameliorate food insecurity-related issues on college campuses.

Food insecurity is defined as the lack of reliable access to enough affordable, nutritious food and is a growing problem on college campuses nationwide. Studies conducted by The Hope Center and colleges and universities across the country are beginning to reveal the extent to which students are affected by food insecurity as well as the root causes of campus hunger. Furthermore, local and national studies reveal that food insecurity in higher education frequently occurs alongside other basic needs insecurities, like housing insecurity. Other factors that contribute to food insecurity include first-generation college student status, and receipt of Pell Grants and federal food assistance. Although efforts to address food insecurity, including on-campus food pantries and food vouchers, do provide temporary relief for students in need, these acute solutions are not enough.

The Campus Food Insecurity Symposium is our effort to bring together experts in the field, and understand better the root causes of food insecurity, and ways to mitigate them. What is unique about this event is its ability to convene academics, administrators, students, and staff from both private and public institutions to have a conversation on food insecurity. We hope that from this event, you gain a deeper understanding of the national problem of food insecurity, learn about the extent to which it affects schools close to us, and find ways to make a difference and join our collective effort. 

Campus Pantry Collaborative
Internship Food Security Taskforce

Internship: Food Security Taskforce at the Montgomery County Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security

 

Ananya Tadikonda

Abstract

This past summer, I worked in the my district's Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, supporting the Food Security Taskforce in efforts to help county residents, particularly those  impacted by the COVID pandemic, receive healthy and culturally competent food resources. We collaborated with over 50 food providers across our district to provide PPE and other materials necessary to distribute food on a weekly basis. My flash talk will focus on reflections from this experience about the structural factors of our society that have exacerbated the dire need for food resources during this pandemic. Overall, I would like to highlight how my experience reminded me of how central food is to social justice, and present a call to action about the importance of my generation of future public health leaders to focus on social justice when brainstorming solutions to address food insecurity in our society. 

NC A&T Mobile Food Pantry: The Impact of Food Insecurity on the NC A&T State University Community

 

Courtney Anderson, Mikayla Massey, and Cole Riley

Abstract

13,000 predominantly Black students are trying to earn a degree in the middle of not only a food desert but a food swamp. The nearest grocery store to North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University is over two miles away yet there are nearly 20 fast-food restaurants and several liquor stores within a mile radius. Social determinants of Health are reliable in predicting the quality of life outcomes for people however several determinants work against each other in Greensboro. Despite students having access to quality education and gaining the sense of community that comes with attending an HBCU, access to fresh produce is limited especially for freshmen and students who do not own a vehicle.

 

Several initiatives have attempted to help grant students and members of the Greensboro community access to affordable healthy foods such as the Aggie Pantry and Aggie Refrigerator. However, the benefits are not enough to address the systemic issue of food insecurity plaguing lower-income Black communities and college campuses across the state. Students are granted an education that teaches them the harms of malnutrition, as well as an understanding of the harmful side effects that food deserts and food swamps bring yet, they cannot escape the reality that these are the quickest and most accessible options for themselves. In a presentation by NCAT alum Nadia More, she states "In Greensboro, it is estimated that 44 percent of people skip meals or cut down on their meal size because of food insecurity." When healthcare operates through private insurance and medicine, it is profitable to poison and starve a community, even if that community is trying to cultivate the leaders of tomorrow.

 

These harms are known and there have been attempts to alleviate those harms, yet the zoning laws allow these fast-food restaurants and liquor stores to exploit this college town. If access to fresh produce affects the well-being of communities, it affects the success of students.

NC A&T Mobile Food Pantry

Combating Food Insecurity at Duke: Feed Every Devil Program

 

Sude Almus, Ahmad Khan, Yuna Kim, Louise Lu, Kehan Zhang

Abstract

The Feed Every Devil Program, or FED, aims to address food insecurity among Duke students. Food insecurity is a serious problem in the university environment, leading to increased anxiety and unhealthy diets, negatively impacting student performance. The FED program tackles this problem with an application that allows students to donate their extra food points through a web interface to a Duke-managed Food Points bank. Students can make requests for food points, and upon approval from a Duke Reach representative, will receive a small supplement from the Food Points bank. Since Food Points expire at the end of each academic year, this solution allows students with extra Food Points to donate them instead of letting them go to waste, while also supporting the overall Duke community. The Food Points in the FED bank would not expire each year which allows the Food Points to be used in the future by a student in need. 

 

As a team, we met with administrative teams from OIT, Student Affairs, and the Bursar's office, to define and develop the required technology infrastructure to facilitate the donation of food points to a food bank for food-insecure students. We reviewed and understood existing policies, defined requirements, and are implementing an easy to use, convenient, and secure platform while also writing new policies and continually meeting with our stakeholders. Ultimately, we wish to decrease food insecurity and we hope you’ll support us in our mission to Feed Every Devil.

Feed Every Devil Code+

GPSG Community Pantry/Founding

 

Nicole Stantial; Rashmi Joglekar, PhD; Kaitlyn Daly, BSN, RN

Abstract

The Duke University Graduate and Professional Student Government (GPSG) Community Pantry was established in 2017. The GPSG Community Pantry is a student-led initiative to provide basic resources for all Graduate and Professional students at Duke University. Students can access non-perishable foods, baby and child care items, personal hygiene products, school supplies, gently used professional clothing and household items from the Community Pantry free of charge. Our mission is to ensure that all Graduate and Professional students and their families do not struggle with food insecurity in order to allow these students to focus on their education. We also collaborate with partners across Duke University and the Triangle area to raise awareness about food insecurity on college campuses.

 

For the very first time, all three directors in the Pantry’s history meet to jointly tell the story of the progress of the pantry over the past nearly four years. First, founding Pantry Director (2017-2018), Rashmi Joglekar, then Ph.D. student in the Integrated Toxicology and Environmental Health Program, addresses how she examined the need for food security and assistance among Graduate and Professional students during the foundational stage of the Pantry. Second, Nicole Stantial, previous Pantry Director (2018-2020) and current sixth-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, discusses building the resources and partnerships necessary to sustain the Pantry as it continued to grow. Finally, Kaitlyn Daly, current Pantry Director (2020-2021) and current third-year Ph.D. student in Nursing explains the impacts COVID-19 has had on Pantry usage and operations and notes improvements the Pantry has sought after to continue to meet the evolving needs of students.

GPSG Community Pantry/Founding
Food Insecurity in Higher Ed - Operational Considerations

Addressing Food Insecurity in Higher Education - Operational Considerations

 

Shannon K. Orr, PhD

Abstract

A 2018 national study of university students conducted by the Wisconsin Hope Lab found that 36% of university students in the United States were food insecure in the 30 days prior to the survey. Food insecurity is associated with lower grades, depression, higher perceived stress and lower graduation rates. Campuses across the country are responding to the problem in a variety of ways, including distribution of food directly to students such as through food pantries, bags of food, grocery gift cards and more. Starting a campus program is not easy - it requires organizational decision-making, administrative support, funding, space, personnel and more. To better understand the challenges of starting and running such programs, we did a national survey of campus food programs in the United States. This research identifies the scope of campus food programs, and more importantly the challenges and opportunities to help other campuses think about food insecurity and implement action plans to address food insecurity.

Best Practices for Recruiting and Managing Volunteers in Campus Food Pantries

 

Natalie Orslene

Abstract

Running a campus food program can be time and personnel intensive. From advertising, fundraising, collecting and sorting donations, stacking shelves, managing paperwork and dealing with waste management; running even a small food pantry can be a challenge. This Flash Talk reports on the results of a national survey of campus food pantries in the United States to highlight the varying roles of staff and volunteers, as well as best practices for volunteer management related to campus food insecurity. Recommendations for recruitment, roles, tracking hours and volunteer management software will also be addressed.

Best Practices for Pantry Volunteers

Duke Student Collaborative on Health Policy (SCOHP)

 

Emma Herold and Brianna Cellini

Abstract

The pandemic has exacerbated issues pertaining to food insecurity, racial inequality, and the survival of small businesses. As members of a Duke student organization, Student Collaborative on Health Policy (SCOHP), we seek to address these impacts of COVID-19 in the Durham community. Over the past semester, we have been working closely with a non-profit organization called End Hunger Durham that works diligently to support food relief agencies, share food resources, and advocate for food security. Together, we are organizing a fundraiser that supports Durham Black-owned restaurants and those in need of food in areas most affected by Covid-19. We plan to raise $6,750 through GoFundMe to purchase $15 gift cards from select Black-owned restaurants in Durham. We will distribute them to 300 families, seniors, and volunteers affiliated with a food pantry called Feed My Sheep, located in a district with the highest number of Covid-19 cases. Finally, we intend to advertise our fundraiser to Duke students, faculty, families, and alumni, as well as the greater Triangle area, to ensure that our fundraising goal is achieved.

Duke SCOHP

Durham Technical Community College’s Campus Harvest Food Pantry

 

Jessica Dormandy

Abstract

Durham Technical Community College’s Campus Harvest Food Pantry reflects on its implementation of new supports to break down barriers exacerbated by Covid-19. This flash talk will provide an overview of the pantry’s growth since Covid-19, the challenges our students face, and the new supports put in place to meet our students’ basic needs so they can succeed at Durham Tech. Through strategic community partnerships along with grant and CARES funds, our food pantry has adapted and expanded our services over the last nine months. Highlights include the implementation of curbside pantry pick-up, food deliveries, frozen family-sized meals, emergency and holiday grocery gift cards, new case management system and wellness calls, and the creation of the Student Parent Success Network and Family Food Scholarships. 

Durham Tech Campus Harvest Food Pantry

Root Causes Fresh Produce Program

Julien Xie

Abstract

Root Causes is a Duke Med-based organization focused on healing the food system through education and outreach, community service, and advocacy. Our key projects include the Fresh Produce Program at the Duke Outpatient Clinic, partnering with the Change Center Community Garden, and working with the Healthy Campus initiative to improve the Duke Health food environment.

Root Causes

TABLE

 

Michaela Ashworth

Abstract

TABLE has been feeding local children at risk for hunger since 2008. Through our hunger relief and nutrition education programs, we provide healthy, emergency food aid to children in Orange County, NC every week and educate them about healthy eating habits.

Why? Nearly 6,000 students in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro and Orange County school districts are eligible for free or reduced meals (2019). These kids are at risk for hunger when they do not have access to meals while at school. When school is located on-site, weekends are a critical time away from school meals potentially causing  kids to return to class hungry on Mondays. When school is remote, transportation to available meals or other food assistance can be a barrier to filling kids’ bellies. TABLE seeks to meet the nutritional needs of local children during these challenging gaps away from school meals.

TABLE

Duke World Food Policy Center

 

Sarah Zoubek

Abstract

The World Food Policy Center (WFPC) is a research, education, and convening organization within Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. Our mission is to advance connected and inclusive food system policy and practice in support of equity and resilience of local and global food systems. At the heart of this work, we learn from and connect unique voices—including people most affected by food system challenges.

Duke World Food Policy Center

Duke Benefits Enrollment Center

 

Meghan Price

Abstract

The Benefits Enrollment Center (BEC) provides assistance to Medicare beneficiaries interested in applying for additional benefits, and is located at the Duke Division of Community Health in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in Durham, North Carolina.

If you have Medicare and a limited income, our BEC provides assistance so you can have access to healthy food, needed medical care, prescriptions, Medicaid, heating assistance as well as other supportive services.

Our area of coverage includes Durham, Granville, and Person Counties. However, if you live in other counties and need assistance, call us to discuss your options.

Duke Benefits Enrollment Center

Tallgrass Food Box

Gerald Harris

Abstract

Tall Grass Food Box is a platform to support and encourage the sustainability of Black farmers, by increasing their visibility and securing space for them in the local marketplace. In a time where small businesses have become even more vulnerable, it is important that we double down in our support of Black farmers. In this vein, we seek to build a capacity for self-determination within our local food systems. 

Every other week we will pull together fresh produce from Black Farmers across NC and put it together in a box for you to pick up. Each box has enough to feed 1-2 people or an individual who cooks more 3 or more times a week. Check back frequently to see how our offering may change week to week.

Tallgrass Food Box

Building Duke's Food Insecurity Safety Net

Sustainability and Quality Assurance, Duke Dining

Marcus Carson

Abstract

Duke dining is in a unique position to improve food accessibility on campus. To work towards food security for all members of the Duke community, Duke dining is working to create a safety net that will improve food access across campus. In this flash talk, Marcus Carson will discuss a four-pronged approach to achieving this goal. Duke dining is committed to being an active part of solutions to food insecurity on campus, and has already started enacting solutions for students on Duke's campus.

Sustainability and Quality Assurance

Food Environment Assessment of Duke Graduate and Professional Students

Lexi Wang

Abstract

The food environment assessment of Duke graduate and professional students revealed many challenges students face when it comes to food security. Some of these barriers include cost of food, transportation to grocery stores, lack of food variety and culturally appropriate options, mental and physical health issues, and racism. This flash talk will go over the different factors that were assessed in the survey and proposes some suggestions to improve food access around Duke's campus.

Food Environment Assessment
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